People First HR Services

First jobs provide lasting career lessons

Colleen Coates

It’s been said that your first job is a lot like your first love. Not only does it usually occur at a point in life when we are young, idealistic and still unaffected by cynicism, time magically smoothes over any rough, unpleasant edges so that we fondly remember only the good things about it.

Even if that first job was as menial, repetitive or altogether unpleasant as possible, there actually were plenty of things worth the misty, water-coloured memory space. Whether our bright-eyed selves realized it or not, that first foray into the working world was a valuable learning experience that laid the foundation for future career success. In fact, many of the lessons you learned back then are still subconsciously applied to the position you hold today.

Jim Slater of Diagnostic Services of Manitoba on the challenge of centralizing

John McFerran

Introducing centralized system presents people challenges

Every year, more than 15 million diagnostic tests are ordered from Manitoba’s public sector — and that’s not including an additional eight to 10 million tests conducted in private facilities.

“Eighty-five per cent of all medical decisions are based on some kind of lab or medical imaging result,” says Jim Slater, CEO of Diagnostic Services of Manitoba (DSM), the non-profit corporation responsible for delivering public laboratory and rural diagnostic imaging services supported by over 1,500 professionals at 79 sites.

Right mentor can help pave way to success

Colleen Coates

It’s easier to climb the corporate ladder when you’re following in the footsteps of someone who has climbed the rungs before you. This is the principle of workplace mentoring, a special type of coaching relationship typically involving a more senior professional and a less-experienced protégé. A mentor is truly a trusted friend who can help the mentee get a better grasp on the unspoken rules of the game, and guide them toward reaching specific career goals.

Bob Brennan of Manitoba Hydro on the power in numbers

John McFerran

 Opportunity abounds in large Hydro workplace

One of the largest employers in the province, Manitoba Hydro employs 6,300 people from Churchill to Emerson, a fact that president and CEO Bob Brennan never takes for granted.

“It’s a sobering thought to know that you’re accountable for the welfare and safety of 6,300 people, especially when they’re working in an environment like a generating station or on a hydro pole,” says Brennan, now entering his 22nd year as head of Manitoba’s electrical power and natural gas utility, where he has spent his entire career.

You need to prepare for ever-changing world of work

Colleen Coates

While the back-to-school season marks a return to the comfort of a regular routine in most families, for students, it is a time of untried challenges and unfamiliar changes. New schools, new teachers, new classmates, new course loads and new expectations are just the tip of the iceberg — the changes are often overwhelming.

Of course, change does not stop upon graduation and our entrance into the working world; on the contrary. The workplace is a rapidly changing environment, and both employees and employers need to prepare to manage the evolving and sometimes unpredictable, developments that come their way.

Urban renewal: From the ivory tower to street level

John McFerran

Lloyd Axworthy, president and vice-chancellor of the University of Winnipeg. (WAYNE GLOWACKI / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS )

The University of Winnipeg is the largest cohort of human activity in the downtown, with 15,000 students, faculty, staff and members of the community engaged on campus.

“There’s a critical mass of people here doing everything from studying to become scientists to putting on performances and attending basketball games. As a centre-of-the-city university, we are an activity hub with an economic impact in the hundreds of millions of dollars,” says Lloyd Axworthy, president and vice-chancellor of the University of Winnipeg.