People First HR Services

Keep keen eye on employee attendance

Colleen Coates

Supervisors need full support of manangement, proper training to manage absenteeism

It’s five to nine in the morning when the phone rings. Before the supervisor answers it, they instinctively look around and take a head count. Who’s calling in sick today?

Whether they want to or not, the responsibility for monitoring employee absences falls to immediate supervisors, who are often the only ones aware when an individual is away from work. They have a good understanding of their staff members’ work habits and are often empathetic to any extenuating circumstances surrounding an individual’s absence. This also puts them in a position to identify patterns of absence and flag potential abuses of the system.

Top 10 must-have HR policies for Manitoba employers

Colleen Coates

 Losing someone close to you is one of the most difficult things a person can go through. As an employer, you may wonder what you can do to help a staff member through this difficult time.

One of the most important things you can do is to give them time — not only time to grieve, but time to manage the often staggering amount of planning, organizing, and paperwork that must be completed to prepare for a funeral if they are entrusted with this incredible responsibility. Having recently lost a close family member, I was shocked at the amount of time needed to complete the arrangements along with necessary legalities. The fortunate ones, like me, have an employer who is not only understanding, but also a leader in better people practices.

Succession planning key priority

Colleen Coates

The baseball term bench strength has become a metaphor for smart succession planning.

To a ball team, bench strength means the skill level and number of quality players available to substitute during any given inning. In business, it’s about the depth, the versatility and the competence of high-potential leaders who are ready to be called up to fill senior-level vacancies in the organization.

For a company to build its bench strength, it needs to incorporate a succession planning process into its talent management efforts. But according to one new report, two-fifths of employers have never used succession planning. Less than one in four organizations (23 per cent) have a formal process for succession planning in place; fewer than one in three (31 per cent) opt for a more informal system.

Code of conduct guides employees around conflict

Colleen Coates

The public has been conditioned to think that conflict-of-interest issues only apply to politicians and other government officials held to high ethical standards. But the truth is that these issues are relevant to every workplace and affect all employers and employees.

Whenever an employee finds themselves in a situation where their interests are at odds with their allegiance to their employer, it is considered a conflict of interest. While most employees will thankfully never engage in bribery or other forms of illegal behaviour for their own personal gain, they may one day come to an ethical crossroads and not know whether to turn left or right because they don’t understand the principles of conflict of interest.